Convicted rapist who swindled the National Lottery out of £2.5million has yet to pay back a penny

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A convicted rapist who ripped off the National Lottery with £2.5million after tampering with a winning ticket has yet to pay back a penny.

Edward Putman had been ordered to repay more than £900,000 and was jailed for nine years for his role in the multi-million fraud in 2019.

The 56-year-old hatched the scheme with a National Lottery employee but was arrested after his co-conspirator committed suicide.

While still in jail, the convict was told to start paying back his ill-gotten gains money, but he hasn’t paid back a single penny.

This is despite the fact that he still owns a £700,000 home and is threatened with a further six years in prison by the authorities.

Edward Putman, 56, was found guilty in October 2019 of using a fake winning ticket to claim £2.5million

The mirror reports that the Crown Prosecution Service confirmed yesterday that the money has not yet been refunded and has given him another three months to pay.

He said a freedom of information request confirmed that Putman, who was jailed for seven years in 1993 for raping a pregnant 17-year-old girl, still owes the “total amount of the forfeiture order of £939,782.44”.

He undertook the scam in 2009 alongside Giles Knibbs, an employee of Camelot, which runs the National Lottery.

He received millions after Knibbs, who worked in the company’s fraud detection unit, forged a counterfeit note.

Putman then submitted it and it was accepted despite missing the bottom half and no barcode.

Putman was told a further six years could be added to his sentence if he did not hand over his assets, valued at £939,782.44.

Putman was told a further six years could be added to his sentence if he did not hand over his assets, valued at £939,782.44.

Putman called Camelot to introduce himself as the winner and said he found the ticket under the seat of his van.  The ticket was accepted as genuine even though it was missing a barcode

Putman called Camelot to introduce himself as the winner and said he found the ticket under the seat of his van. The ticket was accepted as genuine even though it was missing a barcode

Putman was discovered after co-conspirator Giles Knibbs (pictured) took his own life in 2015

Putman was discovered after co-conspirator Giles Knibbs (pictured) took his own life in 2015

The former Mason told Camelot he found the ticket under the seat of his van and claimed it days before the six-month deadline.

After that, Putman was jailed for three months in 2012 after he was found fraudulently claiming £13,000 in benefits despite winning the lottery.

He and his partner reportedly lived a jet set lifestyle, flying all over the world and buying multiple properties.

But his relationship with Knibbs soured after his co-conspirator began to feel he hadn’t received his fair share of the £2.5million prize.

The Camelot worker later confessed to what he did to loved ones, before taking his own life in 2015.

After his suicide, police found notes detailing the fraud and an investigation was opened, but closed when Camelot was unable to locate the alleged forgery.

It was then reopened in 2017 when the ticket was eventually located by a Camelot employee, and he was charged in 2019.

He was found guilty by a jury and sentenced to nine years in prison.

He had already been sent to prison for seven years in 1993 after raping a pregnant 17-year-old girl

He had already been sent to prison for seven years in 1993 after raping a pregnant 17-year-old girl

Handing down his sentence at the time, Judge Gray said the “sophisticated, carefully planned and diligently executed fraud” struck at the heart of the integrity of the National Lottery.

He said: “You would have got away with it, but you were obviously greedy.

“Whatever exact monetary split you and Mr Knibbs agreed to, you did not pay him the split he felt he owed. You argued spectacularly.

“This crime has undermined the integrity of the National Lottery. You have also undermined public confidence in the Lottery itself.

The former bricklayer could lose his home and land in Kings Langley, Hertfordshire in Hertfordshire

The former bricklayer could lose his home and land in Kings Langley, Hertfordshire in Hertfordshire

At a hearing at St Albans Crown Court in January, Putman was told a further six years could be added to his sentence if he did not hand over his assets, valued at £939,782.44, within three months.

He could also lose his home and land in Kings Langley, Hertfordshire, where he had planned to build a hotel.

The house, close to the M25, is currently in a scruffy and neglected condition with curtains drawn and the grounds look like a vehicular graveyard with at least twenty cars and vans parked alongside caravans and mobile homes.

His solicitor Lawrence Selby said: ‘Mr Putman does not accept or accept the benefit figure or realizable assets but will not challenge these proceedings.’

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